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Hydration - page 3

One above the rest: Sir Ben Ainslie

in AMERICAS CUP/INTERVIEWS/SAILING/SOS MAGAZINE/SOS PRO'S/UK
20140204 Copyright onEdition 2014© Free for editorial use image, please credit: onEdition Sir Ben Ainslie. SOS Rehydrate, a new and cutting-edge electrolyte replacement drink, has been launched in the UK by co-founder and former Team England runner, James Mayo along with investor and sailing legend, Sir Ben Ainslie. SOS offers healthy hydration for active lifestyles that is comparable to an IV Drip at combatting mild to moderate dehydration. SOS Rehydrate can be purchased exclusively in Sweatshop stores across the UK until May 2014. Sweatshop is the leading specialist running retailer in the UK, and is the nationÕs favourite having won the RunnerÕs World award for best running retailer for the last seven years in a row. For more information please contact: Laura Hodd at Into the Blue: Laura Hodd Tel: +44 (0)1983 247286 If you require a higher resolution image or you have any other onEdition photographic enquiries, please contact onEdition on 0845 900 2 900 or email info@onEdition.com This image is copyright the onEdition 2013©. This image has been supplied by onEdition and must be credited onEdition. The author is asserting his full Moral rights in relation to the publication of this image. Rights for onward transmission of any image or file is not granted or implied. Changing or deleting Copyright information is illegal as specified in the Copyright, Design and Patents Act 1988. If you are in any way unsure of your right to publish this image please contact onEdition on 0845 900 2 900 or email info@onEdition.com

There has always been evolution within sport. Athletes continually jump higher, run faster, or hit harder than they have before. The rules almost always stay the same; the basketball hoop is still 10 feet high, the goal posts are 8 yards apart, the track is always 400 metres around. Yet in the oldest international sporting event on the planet, the rules are almost never the same.

At the 35th edition of the America’s Cup in Bermuda in 2017, Ben Ainslie will compete to bring the Auld Mug back to Britain where it was first contested in 1851. In doing so, Team Land Rover BAR would be the first British outfit to ever win the event.

The modern America’s Cup is barely recognisable to what it once was. For next years event, Land Rover BAR will have a boat that is designed entirely around the output that its sailors can provide.

This creates a unique situation whereby the design and fitness crew must collaborate closely. The sailors are the engine, which means Ainslie’s crew must be as fit and athletic as possible.

We sat down with SOS athlete Ben Ainslie to find out what him and his crew are doing to be as powerful of an engine as possible.

It’s been said that as the nature of the America’s Cup has changed, sailors have gone from being power/sprint athletes to more similar to endurance athletes like 10km runners or cyclists, given the need to produce constant power. How does this change the focus in training?

The focus has now changed from a requirement for short busts of intense power to much more of a constant power output over 20 – 30 minutes. This is needed to create the hydraulic power necessary to control the boat. Our sailors now train with much more of an aerobic endurance focus. Also, due to the introduction of an overall weight-limit of the crew, weight maintenance is now a critical factor.

You’d need to have an incredible aerobic base with which to then build specific endurance on for different roles on the boat. Given that you officially launched the Great South Run last year, can we assume that running is your go-to?

I do love running but sadly a long-term back injury currently prevents me from any serious running. My main tools for aerobic training are the ‘Watt bike’ and a trusty paddleboard.

“It won’t be easy, and it definitely won’t be fun… but it’s achievable.”

Improvements in training are entirely dependent on recovery, yet training for the boat is incredibly time consuming. How do you prioritise this time to rest with such a demanding schedule?

Our head trainer, Ben Williams, does a great job of factoring in the time spent on the water and amending our onshore training accordingly. The time on the water is incredibly stressful for the sailors both physically and mentally, so balance is crucial in order to avoid burnout.

“The boat needs a lot of power, and it hasn’t got an engine. We need to maximise what the boys can produce in a 20-40 minute window – not too dissimilar to a cycling time trial”.

Scott Dixon has said he can lose up to 7lbs from sweat during an IndyCar race, while you are essentially navigating a race car on the water – how important is keeping fluids down for you and the boys on the boat?

Hydration is going to be a critical factor in this next Americas Cup. The conditions for racing in Bermuda in June are going to be incredibly hot and very humid. Given the physical stress the sailors are under they’re going to need to work hard to retain fluids and need the best performance drink available.

An interview with Steve Vernon – Coach of New Balance Manchester

in BLOGS/INTERVIEWS/RUNNING/SOS PRO'S/UK

Britain is currently in the midst of a distance-running renaissance not seen for decades. Although there were numerous standout results at the Rio Olympics from British athletes, the true indicator of depth has been the quality of performances at home.

At the British Trials for the European XC Championships this winter, the Top 4 automatic spots were taken by athletes that had either broken 13:10 for the 5,000m, 61 minutes in the half marathon, or 28 minutes over 10,000m.

One of the driving forces behind this progress has been the investment of resources into smart coaching and infrastructure to facilitate a model of group training. With the support of New Balance, Steve Vernon has been able to implement this successfully with his New Balance Manchester squad based in Stockport.

We spoke to Steve about the driving forces behind his team, how he manages the inevitable differences between athletes and what sets NB Manchester apart.

 

Your team seems to follow a similar model to your transatlantic cousins in Boston? 

Professional running teams in the USA have been a proven success ground for world-class distance running over the last 5-10 years. Performance athletes are central to New Balance as a brand so supporting athletes in a team environment is something that New Balance were keen to do as part of their global strategy. The professional Team in Manchester is one of the first of its kind in Europe and we are creating an environment that supports athletes to be the best they can possibly be.
Good communication is absolutely essential and I make sure that I am clear with how training is set out each week. I have a training philosophy that I explain to every athlete that joins the team so they know what to expect from the start. I do however appreciate that not every athlete will respond and adapt in the same way to a particular stimulus so although the majority of the training is group focused the schedules are all individual. We meet every day for training and I give the options for athletes to do second runs alone or with training partners that run at a similar speed on recovery runs.

Putting together a full-time training group is a delicate balance; some athletes inevitably find themselves pushing when they shouldn’t be, and everyone has their own routines. What steps do you take to create a balance that everyone can benefit from, despite having individual strengths and weaknesses?

Distance running is an individual sport but I have a culture where everyone supports each other as a team. When the gun goes they inevitably want to beat each other but I ensure that competitiveness is managed in training and they save it for race day!

The increasing number of professional training groups throughout the world has pushed the level of performance up considerably. What makes New Balance Manchester different from other set-ups?

As I mentioned earlier this group in Manchester is quite unique in Europe as there are very few, but we are starting to see more and more groups emerge in the UK especially. We have an athlete house where 4 of the guys live and then everyone else lives within 6 miles of the NB house and training venues.

The athletes are predominantly supported by New Balance, but also receive some support from British Athletics/Welsh Athletics with regards to altitude training camps. The environment we run in is quite spectacular as we are 10 miles from Manchester on the edge of the Peak District National Park with miles of trails, canals, and parkland to run on. We have the option to run on the flat or up and down hills, which I feel is essential to distance running success. There is a strong club structure in the UK and we are lucky to have the support of the local club Stockport Harriers to use the track and its facilities. 

Stockport obviously has a lot to offer, yet few would argue that it could be easier get out the door in warmer conditions. You recently had a training camp in Spain – is this something you will do on a regular basis? What benefits did you see in your athletes?

The weather in the North West of England has a bad reputation but it’s wet and mild all year round so despite the summers never being amazing it is often a nice (15 – 20 degrees centigrade) temperature to train in. We hardly ever get snow in the winter so it rare we have to change plans because of really bad weather. As long as you don’t mind getting a bit wet and muddy occasionally it’s pretty good. Oregon has similar weather and they don’t do too badly over there!

Despite my positivity of the Manchester weather we do like to get away in the dark winter months and Spain in January was simply a chance to get in some quality training, Vitamin D and a change of stimulus for the guys, which I believe can help during the winter grind. I use altitude training and like to get at least 2 camps in for 4 weeks in each year.

 

How to Recover Like a Pro

in LIFESTYLE/RECOVERY/RUNNING/SOS MAGAZINE

How listening less to college coaches and more to Lance Armstrong will help you run faster… legally.

There is a timeless saying, “you don’t get fit when you’re running; you get fit when you’re recovering”. If training was only about running then you’d barely stop, and Dean Karnazes would win every event from the 5,000m to the marathon at the Olympics. Thankfully, that isn’t the case.

EAT

The current obsession about weight in running is incredibly disconcerting. When female athletes become fixated on becoming as thin as possible it is rightly seen as a health concern, yet amongst males it is becoming an expression of masochism and bravado.

The head cross-country coach at Colorado State Art Siemers has become one of many coaches in the NCAA known for fixating on the weight and appearance of his athletes.

Heidi See

“Thin to win” is his catch phrase, and it’s a terrifying precedent to set on young, highly impressionable athletes.

Weight is just one variable in the training equation of stress, recovery, and adaptation. This is a delicate equilibrium that if thrown off balance can have devastating effects. Weight should not be used as a catalyst to precipitate training adaptations; rather it should be a carefully managed bi-product.

If we accept that fitness gains are made during recovery, then carrying less weight through diet restriction to complete a workout faster will only result in an inability to recover properly.

Eat good food; you need it.

 

HYDRATE

There are plenty of ways to skin a cat. Some are more effective than others, but the point stands – hydration has to be taken care of before all else.

Products used for recovery like chocolate milk are crucial for repairing muscle damage through protein synthesis, yet for this process to be as efficient as possible the muscles must be well hydrated. Without hydrating, protein synthesis will be less effective and increase the time needed for recovery.

Balance is also crucial, as our bodies endocrine system is affected by electrolyte losses. If one electrolyte is consumed in high volumes without the correct balance of the hormonal processes will be disrupted.

 

SLEEP

In a 2015 interview with Joe Rogan, Lance Armstrong stated, “naps are performance enhancing”. He’s not wrong. Sleep is when the magic happens, where the money is made, and most of us aren’t getting enough of it.

When we sleep, our body repairs damaged tissue. During the deeper stages of sleep, human growth hormone (HGH) is released into the bloodstream where it helps rebuild muscles and convert fat to fuel.SOS Hydration

The point is simple; when we don’t get enough quality sleep it becomes harder for our body to recover. The modern world isn’t making it easier; it is now commonplace to be looking at your phone in bed, with the emitted light telling your brain to remain awake and vigilant.

Try to avoid your phone, tablet, laptop or anything emitting that kind of light for an hour before you want to be asleep. A good rule of thumb would be 9hrs before you need to wake up. This can have an exponential effect on your ability to have quality sleep and recover.

Train hard.

Eat a lot of good food.

Hydrate.

Go to sleep.

Easier said than done, apparently.

Team New Balance Manchester Blog

in ATHLETES/BLOGS/RUNNING/SOS MAGAZINE/SOS PRO'S/UK

Courtesy of Team New Balance Manchester, Blog #17

This weeks blog will focus on hydration, mainly because it is often a neglected element of training amongst athletes, but it can have a huge effect on both performance and recovery.

Hydration may not be the first thing that springs to mind when you think of training in the UK, especially in Manchester. However, keeping hydrated in a cold and wet Manchester is just as important is it is would be anywhere else in the world! Our requirements here in Manchester probably aren’t quite as high as they would be in a hot, dry desert, but nevertheless, it is still important!

It’s hard to estimate our exact fluid requirements as it varies from individual to individual depending on sweat rate, body size, training load and the environment (temperature, humidity level, altitude). In a normal day, the average person loses 2L of water just through breathing, sweating, urine and bowel movements. Add exercise to your day and this figure can be significantly higher. It’s possible to loose up to 2L per hour through exercise which is quite staggering! A 2% loss in body weight due to dehydration can result in a 20% drop in performance mainly due to the fact that dehydration leads to increased heart rate, increased use of muscle glycogen stores and increased lactate production. None of which are particularly conducive for optimum performance! Along with water, we also loose two main electrolytes in our sweat; Sodium and Chloride. Sodium is the main electrolyte in our bodies, and serves many functions from regulating fluid balance to enabling muscle contraction and controlling blood pressure. Re-hydrating is therefore not only about replacing water.

When it comes to hydrating, here at Team NBMCR we like to use the best, and are very fortunate to have the support of SOS Rehydrate. It is a company founded by international athletes and Doctors. They produce a great tasting oral rehydration formula which is in line with the standards set by UNICEF and the World Health Organisation, and is also trusted by Informed Sport. The combination of electrolytes in SOS Rehydrate can be as effective as an IV drip for mild to moderate dehydration. It’s easy to fall into the trap of buying sports drinks which are branded to be rehydrating, but the reality is, they often often aren’t particularly effective in combating dehydration as they don’t contain quite the right balance of electrolytes and glucose. What this means, without going into too much scientific detail, is that despite taking in lots of fluid in the form of sports drinks, the body doesn’t actually absorb all the fluid and a lot will be lost from the body. The SOS formula on the other hand has the perfect mix of electrolytes and glucose for optimal absorption and hydration. Our bodies can absorb 3 x more water with SOS compared to just drinking water alone!

sos
This image, taken from the SOS Rehydrate website, gives a description of its key ingredients

SOS comes in convenient sachets, which you just pour into water, give it a little shake or stir, and then all you have to do is drink up, which is pretty easy as they taste great too! They come in four flavours: berry, citrus, mango and coconut. Fortunately we all have different favourite flavours on the team so there aren’t too many squabbles about who gets what flavour! On an average day in Manchester, we probably get through around one sachet a day each, but slightly more when we’re away at altitude or warmer climes.

sos-mango-sachets_prod

More information can be found here on the SOS website http://sosrehydrate.com/. We at team NBMCR are big fans of SOS and would definitely recommend it for all your hydration needs!

sos

Just as a side note, here are ten random facts about water and hydration for anyone who’s interested!

  1. Koalas and Kangaroo Rats are two creatures that do not need to drink water to live. They are able to get all their water requirements from other sources such as eucalyptus leaves

  2. Camels can drink 94 litres of water in less than 3 minutes- don’t try this at home!

  3. Breathing in and out uses more than half a litre of water every day

  4. The average human brain is 78% water

  5. You begin to feel thirsty when your body looses 1% of water

  6. A person can live without food for more than a month, but only a week with no water

  7. Hot water freezes faster than cold water

  8. An air traveller can loose approximately 1.5 litres of water during a 3 hour flight

  9. Sound travels almost 5 times faster underwater than in air

  10. The food with the highest water content is cucumber at 96.7% followed by iceberg lettuce and celery

Away from hydrating, we have also been busy training and racing. This weekend Lauren and Jonny are heading to Cheshire for the Alsager 5 mile road race, while Andy is is continuing his indoor season racing a 3,000m in Mondeville, Northern France. Good luck guys!

Locker Room Talk with Mark Coogan

in INTERVIEWS/RUNNING/SOS MAGAZINE/TRAINING/USA
Mark Coogan, 2007
2007 RBK Boston Indoor Games Sat, January 27, 2007, Boston, MA Photo by: Lisa Coniglio Victah1111@aol.com 631-741-1865

Mark Coogan represented the United States at the 1995 world championships (at 5000 meters) and the 1996 Olympics (in the marathon). At Dartmouth, notably, he successfully guided the career of Abbey D’Agostino, 7x NCAA champion. He is currently the New Balance Boston Elite Coach. Daniel Wallis caught up with Mark for this insightful chat on college vs professional attitude, developing coaching knowledge, and training in Boston with his outstanding group of athletes.

SOS Locker Room Talk with Mark Coogan

As a college coach, there are so many variables in the life of a student-athlete that are out of a coaches control. However, as a professional, the idea is that you’re more mature, experienced, and live the required lifestyle. With that in mind, what are a couple of key distinctions in your approach to an athletes’ training between college and as a professional?

Mark Coogan with Abbey D’Agostino during his time at Dartmouth (Photo by Doug Austin) dartmouth.edu

One key distinction that I have noticed is that in a lot of college athletes you really have to find ways to make them train harder. There are a lot of distractions on campus. It also seems that at some colleges now it is about the student-athlete experience rather than doing well. At Dartmouth we tried really hard to make sure the student-athletes had a good experience but also set a tone that you are going train hard and win.

With the professionals that I have coached the last few years, I learned that holding the pros back some days is a key to their success. The professional runners want to succeed so badly that they will over do it if they don’t have a good coach watching and communicating with them. Communication is the key between the coach and professional runner.

College athletes have all the logistical things handed to them, especially if they are from big time schools and conferences. I used to tell the athletes that I coached in college that they could do 2 things well. They can run fast and do well academically but it is really hard to do 3 things well. With the collegiate athlete I would try to make practice the best 2 hours of the day with the hope it would become a top priority. The team would become their family away from home.

The professional runners have to be more responsible than the college runner. They have to do a lot of the logistics on their own. They have to make their own appointments with physical therapy, massage, pay rent, cook their own food, drive to practice etc. Real life stuff! On a college team you have all this at your fingertips and it is done for you.

 

You were self-coached and trained in Boulder with some of the greatest athletes in the history of distance running who all had a wealth of knowledge. As a coach, how do you continue to learn and develop your coaching knowledge?

Mark Coogan, 2007, photo by PhotoRun.net

I always ask a lot of questions. In Boulder, I was kind of the ring- leader trying to get people to train together every day. On runs with Steve Jones, Arturo Barrios and Mark Plaatjes you just absorb what they say and do.

I have never been afraid to ask other runners or coaches what they are doing for sessions. Daniel Coyle is the author of a book called the “The Little Book of Talent” and one of his tips is steal without apology. Improving is about absorbing and applying new information and that is what I try to do. I was lucky enough to be around a lot of the best coaches in America over the past 30 years, a list that includes Charles Torpey, Bob Sevene, Ray Tracey, John Gregorek, Jerry Schumacher, Chris Fox and a few others.

I had the opportunity to train with Providence group from the late 80’s and Boulder crowed in the 90’s. There have been so many great runners and coaches who have influenced my coaching philosophy that I feel I have a very good background, while now at New Balance I have a ton of resources that I can utilise.

Your group is based in Boston, a city often hit pretty hard in the winter. Given it’s that time of year, how does your group adapt it’s training when being outside crosses the line from tough to stupid?

I don’t think Boston is as tough a place to train through the winter as people think it is. On a few days you need to be flexible with your training but other than that you can get your work in. An example of that happened last week. I wanted to have some athletes do a 25-minute tempo run but it was snowy and windy. It was impossible to do it. So we improvised and did cruise intervals on the indoor track. At the end of the day I think we accomplished the same thing. I can tell you it is a lot easier to train in Boston than the other places I have lived – like Dartmouth or Madison, Wisconsin in the winter. When you run in bad weather you really do make yourself a little bit more mentally tough. You can look at the cold weather as a stressor and you will adapt. Then when you see terrible weather in a race you know you can handle it. It is the same reason the Patriots practice outside in Foxborough year round no matter the weather.

 

Behind the Scenes with Clayton Murphy

in ATHLETES/INTERVIEWS/RUNNING/SOS MAGAZINE/SOS PRO'S/USA

SOS athlete Clayton Murphy races with the poise and experience that you’d expect from someone with far more experience. At the US Olympic trials he showed the country that he was more than ‘just’ a great college athlete, then he showed the world he was the real deal as he crossed the line in 3rd place in the 800m in Rio.

We caught up with Clayton to see what makes his wheels turn, and how he has transitioned seamlessly from college to life as a professional athlete.

For the past decade the 800m has come to be dominated by ‘specialists’, runners like Yuriy Borzakovskiy and David Rudisha who are pure half milers. You however, are reminiscent of the likes of Sebastian Coe and Steve Ovett, guys who could mix it up in both the 800m and the mile. Do you see yourself racing more regularly over the mile and above in the future?

I think the future of my race selection is interesting. I really enjoy both races, each with their own challenges and styles. So as far as a favourite I do not have one right now, and training for me for the 800/mile is similar. So I think right now I am really just enjoying both and keeping my options open for the future!

Clayton Murphy
©TrackAndFieldPhoto.com 2016 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials

 

Many American athletes in particular struggle with the transition from college to professional running, especially given the lack of a ‘team’ atmosphere that is easy to become comfortable in. Are there any specific ways you have managed this transition so well?

I think the biggest transition I noticed was that you lose your everyday schedule and support group you had as a collegiate athlete. You lose your teammates, medical staff, academic staff, equipment people, etc. That group is no longer is there, so not only are you making the transition from running a collegiate season, you are transitioning and creating an entirely new support group.

Lucky for me I am able to help coach and train with my collegiate teammates, work everyday with Coach LaBadie still, and use the same massage therapist/sports chiro I used while I was a student-athlete. Being able to keep the core pieces of my “team” with me has been huge in making a smooth transition to life as a professional.

It’s easy to go mad as a professional runner, how do give yourself a break from training and routine day-in, day-out?

I think making sure that I have fun with running is the first priority. Everyday for me training has to be fun. If you are not having fun it doesn’t matter what you do outside of running because you’re going to go insane.

Outside of running I am finishing my schooling to receive a bachelors degree in Finance from the University of Akron, so that takes up time after workouts. I also play a lot of video games including PS4, Xbox One, and PC gaming. My roommates and I are very competitive in FIFA and the Call of Duty games

 

Some half-milers and milers are now making incorporating blocks at altitude in their training. Is this something you have ever considered?

At this point in my career I have not considered altitude training block yet. But I am not against it, I have not researched the idea enough to act on it yet.

Many find it difficult to adjust to life in the village at the Olympic Game’s given they are thrown completely out of their routines. How did you go about each day in Rio to make sure you still did all the little things and remain in a positive mindset?

In Rio for me, and other big meets I really try to just adapt and make do with what I have. I have learned over my three years in college that not every hotel, restaurant, city, practice facility, etc. is going to have the same thing you want every time.

With Rio we had to make a pretty big adaption. Our practice track was 1 to 1.5-hour bus ride away, so we had many runs that had to be done in the village. This was tough running concrete circles but if I wanted to compete well I had to get it done.

 

END

RUNNING AROUND THE HOLIDAYS

in LIFESTYLE/RUNNING/SOS MAGAZINE/TRAINING/USA

It’s that time of year… Christmas, New Years… all that good stuff. Holiday’s are great, except they create some unique challenges when it comes to training.
Runners are creatures of habit; we create routines for ourselves to manage stress and   stay on top of all the variables associated with training. Basically, runners build their own micro ecosystem.

If there is one thing that can disrupt that ecosystem, its travel – which is why you will regularly see runners’ hotel rooms looking like a workout room. The bare necessities for normal humans are a suitcase and a bathing suit. For the runner it’s a foam roller, stretching rope, lacrosse ball, theraband… the list goes on.

Chances are this holiday season you will be travelling, and that your family will still never be able to comprehend why you are “going for a run”, or why you can’t just “fit it in” some other time. Then there is trying to explain why you are so tired all the time, and telling Nana as politely as possible that you already eat a lot and don’t need “fattening up”. Add to that the fact that you’re likely going to be either sharing a room with three other relatives or sleeping on the sofa. Last but not least you’re probably going to be in a place that you don’t do a lot of training in. There is no 4 mile loop that you can shut your mind off on and just lap a couple of times, or your trusty favourite workout spot.ssrun5

Just like exam time during University, the above is all added yet underrated stress on the body. Runners are constantly dancing around and across a very thin red line of peak fitness or injury and illness, and it often only takes a few new variables for the scales to quickly tip. With this in mind, we have put together some simple yet effective tips to help you manage training during the holiday season.

For those lucky enough to be runners in America, annual leave virtually does not exist, so chances are you will be back home in about two or three days.

 

PLAN AHEAD

Sounds simple, yet it is one of the easiest things to forget about. It often feels like Christmas is the day after Thanksgiving, and you go from your Turkey Trot to having lunch next to that weird Uncle who still wants to teach you how to wrestle.

Finding good training spots in new areas is now more accessible than it has ever been, particularly with the rise in popularity of applications like Strava. Look for some popular loops, parks or paths and plan your training accordingly. The data will give you a good sense of where you can run fast, and where you can run without dealing with traffic or a lot of people. University campuses are usually a pretty good starting point, as even if you are in the middle of the town where they made ‘The Hills Have Eyes’ you will probably find a track or some bike paths to run on.

 

GET GOOD AT RUNNING LAPS

There is no point taking any risks while you are running in a new area. By that I mean if you find a decent little park or grassed field somewhere, run it to death. There is nothing worse than trying to do a recovery run and also figure out where the hell you are: stopping and starting, looking down at your phone and trying to navigate out of iTunes and into Google maps. If Bowerman TC can do a 15 mile run on Ronaldo field at Nike WHQ (which is 3 laps to the mile) then you can run around a shitty high school football field for an hour.

 

GET A TRIAL GYM MEMBERSHIP

24hr gyms are everywhere, and they all offer free-trials for a couple of visits. Set one up in advance and head there before and/or after runs. That way you can get into your tights and lay around on the floor with your various shaped balls and stretching ropes without your family thinking that you’re some kind of burlesque performer.

By heading to a gym you can dedicate all the time you need to pre-hab and re-hab and not need to worry about any running-related activities while back at the house. Not only is this easier logistically, its also a lot less stressful as there isn’t any chance you can be made to feel bad for doing your bum exercises while Nana is fisting the turkey with stuffing and everyone else is pottering about the kitchen.

 

REGULATE NOISE & LIGHT

It is perfectly acceptable for people aged 50 or over to fall asleep absolutely anywhere, yet runners often have the energy and motivation levels of the elderly. The advantage Grandad has is that he can turn his hearing aid off and instantly be in nap-heaven.

If you are not lucky enough to require the use of a hearing aid yet, buy some earplugs from the supermarket. If you are a seasoned traveller you will likely have some noise cancelling headphones. Add to this a sleep mask and you have a ripping day-time sleep set up that signals your intentions for a nap and will make people feel bad about trying to wake you. If you can add to this a feet-up situation that involves a blanket and/or a pillow you will have successfully mastered the task.

Target your most important daytime sleeps for after meals when there is a higher likelihood of your family doing the same after they have eaten themselves halfway towards diabetes.

 

MINUTES NOT MILES

Once again, sounds simple, but it can be a huge help. Don’t worry about pace or distance. If you normally cover about 10 miles for a 70 minute run at home but are now somewhere where you are still not quite settled, just do 70 minutes rather than trying to hit an exact pace or distance.

GPS watches are a great tool but can often be more harmful than helpful. Don’t try and force the pace and distance of a run you know inside out back home in an area where you aren’t as comfortable.

 

TAKE A DAY OFF

Getting fit is about a balance between stress and rest. Chances are you will probably be going to sleep later and up earlier than you normally would be. Being surrounded by people every minute of the day can often leave you feeling a bit drained from being ‘on’ so much.

Play it safe and schedule a day off during the week so you can enjoy a lunchtime beer and kick back like a normal person for 12 hours. This will help to restore your reputation as something more than the fanatical ‘exerciser’ in the family.

Toeing the party line like this for a day may cause temporary insanity, given it will be a consistent recycling pattern of sitting, eating and the same stories over and over and over. Still, it will be good for the body and is also a great chance to bank some emotional capital that you will need for leaving early during the opening of presents for your tempo.

 

Enjoy the Holiday’s, and don’t forget to hydrate!

 

 

Fancy running a mile?

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized

OK fancy running a mile? Yep that’s 1609 meters or four laps of the track with 9 meters added on to make it the classic running distance known the world over.

Former world class miler and SOS aficionado Matt Yates gives you his lowdown of how to piece together the jigsaw that is a mile.

Matt Yates

WHAT IS THE MILE?

Here we go, and first things first, the mile is a historic distance loved all over the world and the magical barrier of Sub 4 minutes is still revered on the planet. So don’t take it lightly, you are doing a distance that is as recognized as the marathon as feat of human endurance and speed.

So I am not going into the history but it was ???? who ran the first sub 4 mile. Right that’s your first task go Google that and then you will get a feel for the historic importance of the distance and the mile’s place in our hearts. And why we love the distance in the UK and the USA, not to mention everywhere else on the planet.  While you are at it have read of the Wiki on the famous distance and its variations – HERE

History lesson over, so let’s get back to the game plan for the SOAR Mile and you to PB at Battersea Park on Wednesday 20th July.

TIMING AND PACING:

“STOP” before you take your first stride on the quest to a PB.

Ask your self what time do you want to run for the classic distance of a mile? Be real and think about it and what you can achieve.

When you know the TARGET time write it down on a bit of paper and stick it on the wall, so you are reminded of that ambition and goal on a daily basis.

Next, what pace do you need to run at to achieve your best time or target performance?

I always use this site HERE to calculate all times for sessions for the athletes I coach. For all the sessions below you will need to work out the split times that you need to run to achieve success. So you need to do a bit of pre-session admin and planning. When you have the times write them on your hand at the start of the session and go out and do them.

So, the distance you enter on the form is 1609 meters (yep that’s a mile) and then you fill out the time you want and then you add the rep distance (lap split) to get the time you will need to perform in each rep in training. For example want to run a 5 min mile and the session is 15 x 200 its 37.3 per 200 meters rep. OK the office work admin is done.

WARM UP:

Right, I am stickler for doing it right or don’t bother to do it and that means warming up correctly. What really gets to me? Athletes that turn up in the wrong kit, it pisses me off. (note from the editor: you definitely don’t want Matt Yates pissed off with you before the session has even started) Yes that’s right if you want to warm up for a session you need to get a bit hot and sweaty.

So a decent session warm up:

12/14 minute jog at just faster than walking pace to start with picking up slightly at the end.

Then stretch for 15+ minutes. Check out this for exercises – HERE

Get your race flats on and its time 4 x 80 meter strides at 70% 80% 90% 95% effort and walk slowly back as the recovery. Nice article on racing flats – HERE

10 KEY WORKOUTS:

I am listing 10 key sessions here to get that Mile personal best. What you do between the sessions is simple, its easy running of 25 mins to 45 mins max at your comfort recovery pace and not blitzing it like a Kenyan running the London marathon. Its up to you how many runs you do between the sessions and that’s your call. But remember its about getting the sessions done at decent quality level and using the easy runs to refill the body tank.

1 – Monday 27th June
Find a decent park or sports fields for this session.

Warm up as above and then 8 x 70 secs with 60 secs recovery between reps.

You wont know how far you are running but just run free, fast and in control and concentrate as those reps will get hard about number 5 if you are doing it right.

Warm down jog for 10 mins

2 – Thursday 30th June
Track time (if your in London see what tracks are about near you and check opening times – HERE. This is one of my favorite sessions for the miler.

15 x 200m off the rep time before as recovery, so if you run 37.3 secs you get that as the recovery time and you go again. If you think running slow means more recovery that means you cheat yourself out of the target time.

Remember use the site to the working out what times you need to set out to run on the reps (not reminding you again).

3 – Saturday 2nd July
Track work – yes you guessed it WARM UP correctly.

Then its Bends & Straights.

That’s 100m fast 100m jog for 12 laps.

How fast should you run? Well I say as fast as you can cope with but not like your Usain Bolt. More like that 80% stride you in the warm up. Don’t time it, just run it free and enjoy it the sensation of speed.
Your call if you run the bends fast or maybe you want to run the straights fast?

4 – Tuesday 5th July
Track work – nice session this, and time to feel like a real miler.

Session at target mile pace for the 600m & 400m and then getting faster as reps decrease in distance like you are trying to outkick Seb Coe in a “Phoenix from the flames” moment.

A. 600m (2 mins rest), 400m (2 mins rest), 200m (60 secs rest), 100m

Take 5 mins rest/walk/jog and have an SOS then back at it and see if you can beat the first sets times as target.

B. 600m (2 mins rest), 400m (2 mins rest), 200m (60 secs rest), 100m

5 – Thursday 7th July
Park time session same place as you done the session on the 27th June.

Warm up – then its 12 x 50 secs off 70 secs rest – keep those recovery times spot on and keep on the workload output in the reps. Its going to be tough but your know your going places by the end of the workout.

Warm down.

6 – Saturday 9th July
Track workout

Warm up

Reps at race pace (yep do some admin on that site)

A. 4 x 400m off 90 secs recovery

10 mins rec between sets

B. 4 x 400m off 90 secs recovery

Warm down

7 – Tuesday 12th July
Track Workout

Warm up and get in the competitive zone “FOCUS on the task in hand”.

Time trial day – yep your going on the track and you will do 3 laps at race target pace. That’s 1200m on the track and see if you can get someone to time you and shout your times every 200m to keep you target.

Take a rest for 15 minutes jog/walk hydrate.

Then do 5 x 150 at stride pace you do in the warm up and take a 250 walk between the reps.

Warm down

8 – Thursday 14th July
Track Workout – nice quality feel fast session at slightly faster than race pace. Maybe drop your target time down on the sheet by 15% for the target rep times but that’s your call (see disclaimer at end of article). This session will be over before you know it so give it some.

Warm up

1. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

5 mins recovery walk/jog

2. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

5 mins recovery walk/jog

3. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

Saturday 16th July
Track workout – “The need for speed”, Run these free and as fast as you want and try make each one faster than the last but work into it and enjoy running fast like it’s the last 200 of the race.

Warm up

5 x 200m with your target time as the recovery period. So if you aim to run 5 mins for the mile you get 5 mins recovery time between reps but stay warm and stretched.

Warm down

9 – Monday 18th July
Almost at race day now – so nothing hard, its chill time and get into the SOS partner music listings Evermix 

Track Workout

Warm up

And its easy 4 x 120m stride outs with walk back recovery at a comfortable fast pace.

Warm down

10 – Wednesday 20th July
if in UK enter the SOAR MILE & run new personal best for the MILE.  If not then get your friends to cheer you on to a PB at your local track.  Even get a few of them to pace you.

These are hard sessions, so make sure you are fit enough to take them on, and stop straight away if anything stars to hurt. 

 

Matt Yates ran his first sub 4 mile at 20 years old and has a mile PB of 3.52. Matt was the winner of the New York, Madrid, Sydney, Edingburgh and a whole host of mile races round the world and was one of the worlds top 1500m athletes in the 1990s.

He recently started coaching at the age of 46 and in no time has built up a group of highly succesful young British middle distance athletes. Read more about his training group here in Left Spike magazine – HERE

 

SOS tops independent research trial for effective hydration

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized

SOS subjects’ hydration status significantly improved in an independent research trial.

 

A combined independent study, led by Coventry University and Newman University, in the United Kingdom, analyzed the effectiveness of rehydration beverages following an interval training session in highly trained middle-distance runners.

 

SOS was compared against an electrolyte sports drink tablet (Nuun) and a placebo of flavoured water.

 

The results were resoundingly in SOS’s favour.

 

Within 12 hours of drinking SOS, the subjects had recovered their plasma volume and body mass completely.

 

When taking the electrolyte tablet, or flavoured water, neither plasma volume or the body mass of the subjects had recovered to pre work out levels, therefore increasing their risk of dehydration.

 

This study identifies that the subjects who used SOS hydrated faster and more effectively than those subjects who used other drinks.

 

See Fig 1. and 2.

 

What does this mean?

Simply put, taking SOS facilitates hydration and recovery better and faster than water or Nuun tablets.

 

In sports, hydration is critical. According to Gleeson et al., a loss of 2% body weight can lead to a 5% loss in performance over 10km and a 3% loss in performance over 800m / Mile. That could be the difference between a sub-4 minute mile or a 4:06 mile, a loss of 1 minute 45 seconds over 10km for a 35min target 10km, or the difference between winning and finishing out of the medals.

Fig1 Body Mass

Figure 1: Mean (±95% CI) percentage change in body mass. Placebo (PLA):6% chance of an unlikely benefit; SOS: 84% chance of a likely benefit and ESD (Nuun): 6% chance of an unlikely benefit (Hopkins, 2000).

 

Starting the day in a negative dehydration state will diminish recovery and quality of subsequent workouts. Dehydration can lead to headaches, tiredness, fatigue and potentially more serious complications.

 

 

 

Figure 2 Plasma Volume

Figure 2: Mean (± 95% CI) change in plasma volume. SOS: 81% chance of a likely benefit Vs. ESD; SOS: 96% chance of a very likely benefit Vs. Placebo and ESD (Nuun) 63% chance of a possible benefit Vs. PLA (Hopkins, 2000).

 

 

 

With proven scientific results, SOS should be in every runner’s bottle, whether to hydrate between rounds in competition, to use before, during and after a workout, or to help you stay hydrated for what everyday life throws at you.

 

SOS can be purchased from www.ineedsos.com

 

The Story Behind SOS Hydration

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized

The Story Behind SOS Hydration

 

Who are they?

 

Brothers James (British Champ) & Tom Mayo (sub 4 miler), who are two ex International Middle Distance Athletes & Blanca Mayo (James wife) a Medical Doctor.

SOS Founders 

 

The Background:

 

Back in the 2004 Tom was in the shape of his life and was racing in Spain where he got severely dehydrated due to the unusually hot temperatures. On his return to UK, Tom was consoled by older brother James, who himself was a former international athlete, they discussed the ‘Why’s, What’s & If’s’ after Toms experience and missing out on a huge opportunity to PB and Olympic selection because of his poor preparation and the lack of a decent retail sports hydration product on the market.

 

It was here that the brothers James and Tom vowed to embark on a quest for a suitable alternative to the mass market surgery sports drinks and maybe they just could create the “best in class” product for sports hydration? They began by comparing notes, researching and mixing different products together, from the classic flat coke and salt mix used by athletes in the past, to mixing one part orange juice to four parts water, however no one seemed to offer a solution that could help the active sports person or solve high level performance hydration requirements.

 

Some years later in 2011, by pure chance a seminal moment happened in Tom’s living room, whilst Tom, James and Blanca were chatting about the quest to find a better hydration solution for athletes, James turned on the news, which was reporting the drought in East Africa and the serious critical issue of dehydration in children. It was this ‘Eureka’ moment that Blanca turned there attention to medical products that treat extreme dehydration used in disaster zones and ER departments – the first drop of SOS was born.

 

 

The Problem:

 

  • Dehydration can lead to a 25% loss in performance, which is BIG.

 

  • Sports drinks don’t replace the correct amount of electrolytes in the body

 

  • We (and most runners) used to make our own concoctions because the sports sugar based drinks just don’t work.

 

  • The so-called sports drink companies have formulas that are almost 40 years old.

 

  • The sports drink companies sponsor ‘Teams’ and ‘self fulfilling research’ at universities they pay, which endorse the ‘sugar is needed’ myth to please the general population’s artificial sweet taste buds – in the meantime contributing to kids obesity and poor dental health and also ignoring the fact that their sponsored elite athletes don’t use their products (We know. You should see our SOS delivery address book).

 

We can honestly say we never met ANY athlete on the world circuit in our day that said ‘WOW’ that sports drink helped me perform today. Because they DON’T till NOW!

 

The Solution:

 

So with real medical credentials of treating dehydration and first hand world-class athletic experience, SOS have a team who could test and medically trial the best formulas to solve dehydration once and for all.

 

(Doctor) Blanca set to work creating a hydration formula specifically designed for active lifestyles based off the best medical science and the best sporting research into sweat loss using Tom, James and friends as the product testers.

 

The Result:

 

  • A hydration drink mix as effective as an IV drip.
  • A hydration drink that replaces the correct amount of electrolytes and not a token gesture.
  • A hydration drink that is Low in calories / Low in sugar product.
  • A hydration drink that’s focus is purely and only electrolyte replacement for the athlete.
  • Oh, and it’s also good for active lifestyles and the odd celebratory next day hangover too (yes, we know, we tested it, it works).
Those were the days ...
Those were the days …

 

The Wish:

 

If dehydration can lead to a 25% loss in performance what could we have achieved had we had SOS back then?

 

Check out the rest of the story of SOS here:

www.ineedsos.com

 

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